© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Artifacts' Fate Contested at Noted Space Museum

The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kan., houses artifacts ranging from rockets to flight jackets.
Greg Allen, NPR
The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kan., houses artifacts ranging from rockets to flight jackets.

A famed Kansas space museum finds itself at the center of a criminal case over the fate of several NASA artifacts. The museum's former president has been charged with selling several items that were on loan to the museum.

Max Ary led the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kan., for more than 25 years; he left to head another space museum three years ago. He now faces theft and fraud charges, accused of selling six items belonging to NASA and trading several others. Prosecutors say Ary made about $180,000 from the transactions.

Ary, a co-founder of the Cosmosphere, is credited with taking an obscure planetarium, once a fixture at the Kansas State Fair, and creating a world-class museum that draws some 300,000 visitors each year. The museum's collection includes the Apollo 13 command module and the Liberty Bell 7 space capsule, recovered and restored after spending 38 years on the ocean floor.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and environmental stories. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.