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Bush Marks Memorial Day at Arlington Cemetery

In his Memorial Day address at Arlington National Cemetery, President Bush said the United States must continue fighting terrorism in the name of those who have already died fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images
In his Memorial Day address at Arlington National Cemetery, President Bush said the United States must continue fighting terrorism in the name of those who have already died fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Americans honored their war dead at military cemeteries and other venues across the nation on Monday to mark Memorial Day.

For the 138th observance of the solemn holiday at Arlington National Cemetery, President Bush laid the traditional wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Noting that some of the nearly 2,500 fighting men and women killed in Iraq and the 270 killed in Afghanistan are buried in the cemetery, Bush said the nation should respect their sacrifice and continue the fight.

"We have seen the costs in the war on terror that we fight today," Bush said. "I am in awe of the men and women who sacrifice for the freedom of the United States of America."

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