© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Bush Climate-Change Conference Has Doubters

President Bush has invited 15 countries to a two-day conference on global climate change. But the meeting is being greeted with some skepticism.

The U.S. emits a quarter of the world's greenhouse gases, and the Bush administration has been criticized for its unwillingness to commit to cutting those emissions.

Mr. Bush took the U.S. out of the Kyoto protocol, the international treaty designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Some countries are afraid Mr. Bush will use this week's talks as a substitute for a binding treaty when Kyoto expires in five years.

The administration counters that the president has done far more on climate change than he is getting credit for. Officials point to President Bush's proposal to replace 20 percent of the country's gasoline with renewable fuels.

Mr. Bush is expected to propose that the group set a long-term global goal for reducing emissions, and that each nation outline its own plans by the end of next year.

There is agreement on one point: Without a strong commitment from the U.S. and China, real progress on global warming will be difficult.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Elizabeth Shogren is an NPR News Science Desk correspondent focused on covering environment and energy issues and news.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content