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Imagining 'Joe The Plumber: The Epic'

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

And now, a program that may or may not become into a TV station near you.

Unidentified Man #1: In a world of fiscal chaos, in a nation of flanged and insulated pipes, only one man can ensure the soundness of our economy and the smooth flow of our household sewage.

(Soundbite of phone ringing)

Mr. JOE THE PLUMBER: Joe the Plumber.

Unidentified Man #2: From the creators of the "West Wing," "Dirty Jobs," and "Bob the Builder" comes a new series that probes the depths of political intrigue, even as it plunges the hairball from the powder room floors. Joe the Plumber.

(Soundbite of phone ringing)

Mr. JOE THE PLUMBER: It's Joe.

Mr. HANK PAULSON: Joe. Hank Paulson here. Look, we've got ourselves in a heck of a mess, and I'm hoping you can help us. Wall Street's going down the drain. Credit's plugged up, and it looks like the trillion dollar bailout might not be enough. The economy is in the toilet. What can we do?

Mr. JOE THE PLUMBER: Have you tried using a snake?

Unidentified Man #2: Joe the Plumber, from the tip of his wrench to the back droop of his trousers, he's a small businessman who's not afraid to get his hands dirty.

Mr. JOE THE PLUMBER: Credit line's clogged? Ben Bernanke's per day, I'm on it.

Unidentified Man #2: Joe the Plumber. It's the blockage, stupid.

BLOCK: Plumbing satire by Bruce Kluger and David Slavin, with Rob Webb and Chuck Lewkowicz. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Bruce Kluger
Bruce Kluger and David Slavin began writing satire for NPR’s All Things Considered in 2002, after their initial attempts at collaboration -- brokering a Mideast peace accord and mapping the human genome -- proved unsuccessful.
David Slavin
David Slavin and Bruce Kluger began writing satire for NPR's All Things Considered in 2002, after their initial attempts at collaboration — brokering a Mideast peace accord and mapping the human genome — proved unsuccessful.

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