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Tina Brown's Internet Reading List

Tina Brown is the editor of The Daily Beast.
Getty Images
Tina Brown is the editor of The Daily Beast.

Even when summertime seems to slow down the news, great stories continue to emerge — often at an overwhelming pace. So Steve Inskeep spoke to Tina Brown, the editor of The Daily Beast, for some thoughts on what's worth fishing out of that river of information. Here are her recommendations:

"Here Come The Racists," Matthew Yglesias' piece for The Daily Beast, examines the aftermath of Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s arrest by the Boston police — specifically, says Brown, how the affair has triggered race-based "pummeling" of President Obama by conservative commentators.

"When Novelists Sober Up," by Tom Shone discusses the role of alcoholism in America's literary tradition for MoreIntelligentLife.com.

"The Paris Review Interviews: Gay Talese," by Katie Roiphe, details Talese's dedication to nonfiction and literary journalism. "For me, the great love of this piece is that it really shows a moment when literary journals ... really gave the writer space and scope to develop great, great narrative fiction," Brown says.

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