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Accused LAX Gunman Ordered Held Pending Trial

Paul Ciancia, 23, the accused shooter at Los Angeles International Airport, has been ordered held without bond pending trial. The Nov. 1 shooting killed a TSA agent and wounded three other people.
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Paul Ciancia, 23, the accused shooter at Los Angeles International Airport, has been ordered held without bond pending trial. The Nov. 1 shooting killed a TSA agent and wounded three other people.

The man accused of opening fire last month at Los Angeles International Airport, killing a TSA agent, was ordered Wednesday to be held without bond pending his trial.

Judge David Bristow determined that Paul Anthony Ciancia, 23, was a flight risk and a danger to the community.

Ciancia's appearance at a San Bernardino County jail facility where's he's being kept in federal custody is his first in public since the Nov. 1 shooting at LAX's Terminal 3. He was shackled at his hands and feet, and wasn't asked to enter a plea. If convicted, Ciancia faces the death penalty.

As Mark noted at the time, the shooting killed Gerardo Hermandez, a Transportation Security Administration officer, and wounded three other people.

Airport police then shot and wounded Ciancia.

The judge scheduled a preliminary hearing for Dec. 18 and an arraignment for Dec. 26 — both in Los Angeles.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Krishnadev Calamur is NPR's deputy Washington editor. In this role, he helps oversee planning of the Washington desk's news coverage. He also edits NPR's Supreme Court coverage. Previously, Calamur was an editor and staff writer at The Atlantic. This is his second stint at NPR, having previously worked on NPR's website from 2008-15. Calamur received an M.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri.

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