© 2022 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

GM Fuel Gauge Recall Affects Thousands Of SUVs

A new GM recall over defective fuel gauges affects the 2014 Buick Enclave (seen here), along with the Chevrolet Traverse and GMC Acadia.
AP
A new GM recall over defective fuel gauges affects the 2014 Buick Enclave (seen here), along with the Chevrolet Traverse and GMC Acadia.

Weeks after issuing recalls for safety problems in some of its most popular cars, GM says it needs to fix defective fuel gauges that can give SUV drivers little or no warning their vehicle might run out of fuel. GM's latest recall potentially affects 51,640 SUVs that were built in 2013.

GM has been criticized for its handling of recalls this year, which include a steering flaw and problems with ignition switches and air bags. Each of those recalls affected hundreds of thousands of vehicles.

The fuel gauge problem can be fixed by adjusting the vehicles' software, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The agency's website details the vehicles involved:

"General Motors... is recalling certain model year 2014 Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, and GMC Acadia vehicles manufactured March 26, 2013, through August 15, 2013. In the affected vehicles, the engine control module (ECM) software may cause the fuel gauge to read inaccurately."

Explaining the problem in a letter to NHTSA, GM's investigation unit wrote that defective calibration of the ECM "may result in inaccurate fuel
gauge readings at both the high and low end of the fuel range by as much as one quarter of a tank."

GM says the work to fix the problem will be carried out with no charge to the owners, noting that the vehicles are still under warranty.

"The company doesn't know of any crashes or injuries related to the problem," the AP reports. "GM says dealers will reprogram the software for free, starting immediately. The company will also notify owners by mail."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content