© 2022 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Another Winter Storm Slams The Northeast

A woman walks with two dogs as snow falls on Boston Common in Boston, on Saturday.
Michael Dwyer
/
AP
A woman walks with two dogs as snow falls on Boston Common in Boston, on Saturday.

The fourth winter storm in the Northeast this year was adding to the 6 feet of snow already on the ground in some areas, bringing with it hurricane-force winds and near-white-out conditions.

In Massachusetts, Gov. Charlie Baker said at a news conference early today that snowfalls had already "significantly exceeded" expectations. Accumulation in the northern half of the state exceeded a foot in some places.

According to The Boston Globe, Baker "urged residents to stay off the roadways through early Sunday afternoon, when the worst part of the storm was expected to pass."

Baker said the storm was "officially a blizzard," the Globe said, but National Weather Service meteorologist Alan Dunham said the weather service likely would wait until the end of the storm to declare the storm a blizzard, according to the newspaper.

The Associated Press writes:

"Before it is all over, southern New England could get several more inches and Maine could see up to 2 feet, weather forecasters said.

"Transportation officials in the region had taken precautions. Nearly 400 Sunday flights were canceled at Boston's Logan International Airport, and none was scheduled Sunday morning. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority canceled all rail, bus and ferry service in the Boston area on Sunday."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content