© 2022 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

'I'm Struggling To Walk': Serena Williams Withdraws From French Open

Serena Williams serves during her Women's Singles first round match against Kristie Ahn on day two of the 2020 French Open at Roland Garros on Monday in Paris, France.
Julian Finney
/
Getty Images
Serena Williams serves during her Women's Singles first round match against Kristie Ahn on day two of the 2020 French Open at Roland Garros on Monday in Paris, France.

Serena Williams unexpectedly ended her latest bid to tie the record for the most Grand Slam singles titles early. She withdrew from the French Open on Wednesday because of an Achilles injury.

"I'm struggling to walk, so that's kind of a tell-tale sign that I should try to recover," the tennis player said during a press conference.

Williams, a 23-time Grand Slam singles champion, injured her Achilles in a U.S. Open semifinal loss to Victoria Azarenka earlier this month. She was set to play Tsvetana Pironkova on Wednesday. But after a "very short" warm up, she and her coach decided it was best to not play.

On Monday, she beat Kristie Ahn in a 7-6 (2), 6-0 victory.

Williams has been bidding for her 24th major singles trophy for the last few years, which would tie with Margaret Court for most in history. Her next chance will be the Australian Open in January.

She thinks she'll need to take four to six weeks to recover.

"I think Achilles' is a real injury that you don't want to play with because that is not good if it gets worse. I think it's one of the worst. So I don't want it to get to that point," she said.

"I don't know if I'll be able to play another tournament this year," she added.

Reese Oxner is an intern on NPR's News Desk.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content