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Fresh Air Weekend: America's Militia Movement; Chef Marcus Samuelsson

Chef Marcus Samuelsson's new book is called <em>The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food. </em>
Angie Mosier
/
Little, Brown
Chef Marcus Samuelsson's new book is called The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

After Covering Civil War Overseas, Journalist Examines U.S. Militia Movement: Atlantic writer Mike Giglio profiles the Oath Keepers, a pro-Trump militia group, in a new article. "They believe that there is a very strong likelihood of civil violence in America," he says.

From Springsteen To Stevie Wonder, Veteran Musicians Capture The Moment: Three new songs from established acts speak to the times: "Ghosts," by Bruce Springsteen; "Can't Put It in the Hands of Fate," by Stevie Wonder; and "Didn't Want to Be This Lonely," by The Pretenders.

Marcus Samuelsson: Erasing Black Culinary History Ignores 'The Soul Of American Food': "We've been programmed to say great stuff comes from Europe and not from Africa," Samuelsson says. The chef's new book, The Rise, is a celebration of Black excellence in the culinary world.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

After Covering Civil War Overseas, Journalist Examines U.S. Militia Movement

From Springsteen To Stevie Wonder, Veteran Musicians Capture The Moment

Marcus Samuelsson: Erasing Black Culinary History Ignores 'The Soul Of American Food'

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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