© 2023 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Major And Champ Are Major Champs In This Election: Dogs Return To The White House

President-elect Joe Biden's dog Champ stands during speeches at the vice president's residence in 2012. When the family returns to Washington, Champ will have to show his younger brother, Major, the ropes.
Win McNamee
/
Getty Images
President-elect Joe Biden's dog Champ stands during speeches at the vice president's residence in 2012. When the family returns to Washington, Champ will have to show his younger brother, Major, the ropes.

It's the question that millions of Americans have spent five long, anxious days waiting and wondering about: Will there be any dogs in the White House come January?

OK, in what was likely the most consequential election of a lifetime, this is probably the least consequential implication. But it's true. After four years of a president who couldn't abide pets, dogs will once again cavort on the White House lawn.

And yes, President-elect Joe Biden did campaign on that platform. At least on social media.

Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, have two German shepherds, Major and Champ.

While there is a very long tradition of presidential pets, one of the Biden dogs will be making a bit of history. NBC News has reported that Major will be the first rescue dog in the White House. The Bidens fostered and then adopted Major two years ago, through the Delaware Humane Association.

The Bidens got Champ as a puppy in 2008, while Biden was serving as vice president.

On Twitter, Democratic dogs are unleashing a lot of joy over the news.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.