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U.S. Women's Soccer Team Advances To Knockout Round After A Draw Against Australia

Australia's Sam Kerr and Julie Ertz of the U.S. battle for the ball during a women's soccer match at the Tokyo Olympics on Tuesday.
Fernando Vergara
/
AP
Australia's Sam Kerr and Julie Ertz of the U.S. battle for the ball during a women's soccer match at the Tokyo Olympics on Tuesday.

The U.S. women's soccer team is advancing to the knockout stage of the Tokyo Olympics soccer tournament after a nervy, 0-0 draw against Australia.

In what was an unusual sight for these Olympics, there were a small number of fans in the stadium for the game. About 1,000 schoolchildren had been given tickets.

The result today was enough for the U.S. team to secure the runners-up position in Group G, after losing their first game against Sweden and later defeating New Zealand.

They'll next play the winner of Group F (China, Brazil, Zambia or the Netherlands) on Friday.

The team entered the tournament unbeaten in 44 games, before losing that opening match to Sweden.


This story originally appeared on the Morning Edition live blog.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

William Jones is a Supervising Editor for Morning Edition and the Up First podcast. He's no stranger to public media, having worked previously as a reporter and producer for New York's PBS station, WNET. During his time there he was nominated for an Emmy for his piece on New York's oldest bar, McSorley's Old Ale House.
Emily Alfin Johnson
Emily Alfin Johnson is a producer for NPR One.

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