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Eversource will pay its Connecticut customers about $35 each for its poor Isaias response

An Eversource energy car stops at a road that's blocked due to fallen trees on Aug. 7, 2020, a few days after Tropical Storm Isaias.
Yehyun Kim
/
CTMirror.org

Connecticut utility customers will get an average of $35 refunded on their bills from Eversource in December and January.

It’s part of a $100 million agreement with the state to atone for the company’s flawed response to Tropical Storm Isaias.

Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont and Attorney General William Tong announced the agreement that directs $65 million in Eversource funds to be returned to customers.

Eversource had already agreed to a $28 million penalty brought by the state’s energy regulatory authority due to the tropical storm in 2020. Ratepayers are currently seeing this credit on their bills.

The remaining $10 million will go towards customer’s utility payment plans.

The agreement also requires the utility company to create a new Connecticut-based position called the president of Connecticut light and power.

The president would help with communication to customers during storms.
Copyright 2021 WSHU. To see more, visit WSHU.

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Clare Secrist

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