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Fresh Air Weekend: Oscar Isaac; Katie Couric

Oscar Isaac, shown here at the 2020 Academy Awards, credits his father with introducing him to acting: "I started making movies with his camcorder."
Richard Harbaugh
/
A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images
Oscar Isaac, shown here at the 2020 Academy Awards, credits his father with introducing him to acting: "I started making movies with his camcorder."

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

For Oscar Isaac, life — and acting — is all about impermanence: Isaac says the bonds he makes on set are both meaningful and transient: "You have these really intense months ... and then it goes away." He stars in Dune, The Card Counter and Scenes from a Marriage.

Velvet Underground documentary gets to the heart of the band's radical magic: Todd Haynes' inventive, immersive movie is full of interesting ideas. The Velvet Underground neatly sidesteps the usual rock-doc banalities as it plunges us into the Velvets and their world.

After years of trying to be likable, Katie Couric is letting that go: The former Today co-host recently bought a T-shirt that says, "I'm not for everyone." Her new memoir, Going There, is a candid look at the successes and setbacks she's experienced as a journalist.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

For Oscar Isaac, life — and acting — is all about impermanence

Velvet Underground documentary gets to the heart of the band's radical magic

After years of trying to be likable, Katie Couric is letting that go

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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