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Bridgeport community organizations see an influx of federal funds

Davis Dunavin
/
WSHU

Funds from the American Rescue Plan have started to reach Bridgeport, Connecticut, communities hard hit by the pandemic.

Mayor Joe Ganim of Bridgeport announced a series of awards this week to community support organizations across the region.

Joe Torres is the executive director of Caribe Youth Leaders in Bridgeport. He said the funds will help the community recover.

“The unprecedented pandemic brought new challenges, heartbreak and anxiety for many of us including our youth,” he said. “The funding will allow us the ability to provide new enrichment programs and activities and build capacity to serve more youth.”

Ganim said children have been particularly hard hit by the pandemic. His administration allocated more than $18 million to groups that support youth.

“The organizations that have done so much with so little,” he said. “We know now that with some increased funding you are going to do an even better job and you are going to impact even more young people.”

More than 60 youth community groups across the region received funds from Bridgeport’s share of American Rescue Plan funds.

Copyright 2021 WSHU. To see more, visit WSHU.

John Kane

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