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Biden nominates 2 women of color to lead the OMB

Shalanda Young testifies during a Senate Budget Committee hearing to examine her nomination to be Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 2, 2021.
Patrick Semansky
/
AP
Shalanda Young testifies during a Senate Budget Committee hearing to examine her nomination to be Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 2, 2021.

President Biden has nominated Shalanda Young to be director of the White House Office of Management and Budget and Nani Coloretti as deputy director, the White House said.

Young is currently the OMB deputy director. She has been serving as the acting director for the past eight months after Biden's first pick for that job, Neera Tanden, withdrew because several senators said they wouldn't support her nomination. Young, a former top aide to the House Appropriations Committee, will become the first Black woman to hold the OMB director job if confirmed by the Senate.

Coloretti, a Filipina American, is the senior vice president for financial and business strategy at the Urban Institute. She was deputy secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the Obama administration.

"Shalanda Young and Nani Coloretti are two of the most experienced, qualified people to lead OMB. Each has been confirmed before by the United States Senate with strong bipartisan support," Biden said Wednesday. "I urge the Senate to swiftly confirm them again so they can lead OMB at this important time."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Franco Ordoñez is a White House Correspondent for NPR's Washington Desk. Before he came to NPR in 2019, Ordoñez covered the White House for McClatchy. He has also written about diplomatic affairs, foreign policy and immigration, and has been a correspondent in Cuba, Colombia, Mexico and Haiti.

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