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Ivermectin does not prevent COVID-19 hospitalization, a new study says

A health worker shows a box containing a bottle of Ivermectin in Cali, Colombia, on July 21, 2020.
Luis Robayo
/
AFP via Getty Images
A health worker shows a box containing a bottle of Ivermectin in Cali, Colombia, on July 21, 2020.

The anti-parasitic ivermectin doesn't reduce the risk of hospitalization from COVID-19, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study serves as more evidence for what health professionals have been saying for much of the pandemic: the cow and horse de-wormer shouldn't be used to treat COVID.

In the large study, researchers in Brazil studied more than 1,300 patients, half of which received ivermectin and the other half a placebo.

In their conclusion, the authors said, "Treatment with ivermectin did not result in a lower incidence of medical admission to a hospital due to progression of Covid-19 or of prolonged emergency department observation among outpatients with an early diagnosis of Covid-19."

There have already been some clinical trials done earlier in the pandemic that showed ivermectin is not effective against COVID-19.

The Food and Drug Administration has strongly urged against using the animal version of ivermectin to fight COVID-19, warning it can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, neurologic disorders and potentially severe hepatitis requiring hospitalization.

This warning hasn't stopped the drug's popularity with some people seeking to treat COVID.

Popular podcaster Joe Rogan said he used the drug to treat his COVID-19 infection. He said at the time that his treatments also included monoclonal antibodies, Z-pack antibiotics and a vitamin drip for "three days in a row."

This drug has was even administered to inmates in Arkansas.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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