© 2023 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Maine GOP Sen. Susan Collins says she'll vote for Supreme Court nominee Jackson

Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson meets with Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, on Capitol Hill on March 8. Collins now says she'll vote for Jackson's nomination. If confirmed, she would be the court's first Black female justice.
Carolyn Kaster
/
AP
Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson meets with Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, on Capitol Hill on March 8. Collins now says she'll vote for Jackson's nomination. If confirmed, she would be the court's first Black female justice.

Updated March 30, 2022 at 9:33 AM ET

Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson has picked up at least one Republican vote for confirmation.

Maine Sen. Susan Collins said in a lengthy statement released on Wednesday that, after meeting with Jackson twice in person, "I have concluded that she possesses the experience, qualifications, and integrity to serve as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court. I will, therefore, vote to confirm her to this position. "

Jackson has had united support from Democrats — including West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin — which would be enough for Senate confirmation, and the White House has made significant outreach to GOP senators it hoped could support the nominee in hopes of getting bipartisan backing.

Collins was one of a few Republicans to support Jackson's lower court nomination last year, and she criticized the partisan approach to Supreme Court nominations in her statement:

"In my view, the role the Constitution clearly assigns to the Senate is to examine the experience, qualifications, and integrity of the nominee.  It is not to assess whether a nominee reflects the ideology of an individual Senator or would rule exactly as an individual Senator would want."

If confirmed, Jackson would be the court's first Black female justice.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NPR's Washington Desk

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content