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Russia-Ukraine war: What happened today (April 18)

Firefighters battle a blaze after a civilian building was hit by a Russian missile on Monday in Lviv, Ukraine. Ukrainian officials said at least seven people were killed and more were wounded in missile strikes in different areas of the city.
Joe Raedle
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Firefighters battle a blaze after a civilian building was hit by a Russian missile on Monday in Lviv, Ukraine. Ukrainian officials said at least seven people were killed and more were wounded in missile strikes in different areas of the city.

As Monday draws to a close in Kyiv and in Moscow, here are the key developments of the day:

Missile strikes were reported in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv, which has been a relative haven since the start of the war on Feb. 24. Ukrainian officials said seven people died and 11 people were injured after at least four missiles hit the city shortly after sunrise.

Russia has moved additional forces into Ukraine over the past several days, building up to an expected offensive in the east, according to the Pentagon. Heavy fighting continues in several cities including Kharkiv in the northeast, Izium in the east and Mariupol in the southeast. Russian forces have reportedly taken control of the town of Kreminna in Ukraine's eastern Luhansk region, according to a regional military official.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy formally submitted a completed questionnaire as a first step toward European Union membership. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen visited Kyiv on April 8 and offered to fast-track Ukraine's bid to become a member.

Moscow's mayor estimated that some 200,000 people could lose jobs as a result of foreign companies exiting Russia or suspending operations there. He said authorities have approved an aid package worth 3.4 billion rubles, or roughly $41 million, to support workers at risk of a layoff with training, temporary employment and other measures.

More people crossed from Poland into Ukraine than fled across the border over the weekend -- for the first time since the war began. That's according to the Polish border service, which reported 22,000 people crossed into Ukraine on Saturday and 19,200 left. The mayor of the capital Kyiv and other Ukrainian officials have warned that it's not yet safe to return.

In-depth

How some in Ukraine are celebrating holy days ahead of the Orthodox Easter despite the war.

Polls show most Russians support the military. An independent Russian pollster says this tells us more about what people are willing to say than what they believe.

What can a blank piece of paper, four ballerinas, a scarf and snuff box mean in Russia? NPR's Rough Translation digs into coded protests.

NATO troops conducted a routine war exercise in the Arctic. This year felt different.

Speaking of genocide, Biden escalates the war of words over Ukraine.

Photos

Russian airstrikes hit targets in Lviv, Kharkiv and across Ukraine.

Earlier developments

You can read more news from Monday here and daily recaps here. For context and more in-depth stories, you can find NPR's full coverage here. Also, listen and subscribe to NPR's State of Ukraine podcast for updates throughout the day.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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