© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Bear cub rescued after getting head stuck in plastic jug

This photo combination, provided by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection - Wildlife Division, shows a bear cub with a plastic container stuck on its head, in Harwinton, Conn., Thursday, June 23, 2022. After waiting for the cub to come down from the tree, it was successfully tranquilized, and the container removed. Once freed, the cub and its mother were reunited, state wildlife officials said.
(Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection - Wildlife Division via AP)
This photo combination, provided by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection - Wildlife Division, shows a bear cub with a plastic container stuck on its head, in Harwinton, Conn., Thursday, June 23, 2022. After waiting for the cub to come down from the tree, it was successfully tranquilized, and the container removed. Once freed, the cub and its mother were reunited, state wildlife officials said.

HARWINTON, Conn. (AP) — Wildlife biologists in Connecticut had to rescue a bear cub that got its head stuck in a plastic container, state wildlife officials said.

The misadventure happened June 23 when a mother bear with three cubs knocked over a garbage can in the town of Harwinton in Litchfield County, and one of the cubs stuck its head in a clear plastic jar that had spilled out.

“Given the warm weather and tight fit of the container, it was important to try and free the cub quickly,” the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s Fish and Wildlife Division posted on Facebook.

Wildlife biologists waited for the cub to come down from the tree it was perched in and then tranquilized it and removed the container.

The bear was unhurt and quickly found its mother waiting nearby, the wildlife officials said.

DEEP spokesperson Will Healey said the incident shows why residents should make sure their garbage is property disposed of and secured. “We all need to do our part to keep bears and other wildlife safe and wild,” he said.

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.