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Sun spoil Bird’s final game in Connecticut, beat Storm 88-83

UNCASVILLE, Conn. (AP) — Alyssa Thomas scored 19 points and the Connecticut Sun spoiled former UConn star Sue Bird’s final scheduled game in the state, beating the Seattle Storm 88-83 on Thursday night.

Brionna Jones added 13 points, and Courtney Williams and DeWanna Bonner each had 12 for the Sun (20-9).

The 41-year-old Bird finished with 14 points and seven assists for the Storm (18-11). Two other former UConn stars, Breanna Stewart and Gabby Williams, had 17 and 16 points respectively.

The arena was awash in UConn gear, Bird national team jerseys and her familiar No. 10 Storm jersey.

The game was the first sellout in Uncasville since the 2019 WNBA Finals and many of the fans were there to see Bird. They gave the 41-year-old a standing ovation during a pregame ceremony and another during player introductions.

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