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Fresh Air Weekend: Seth Meyers; British 'Office' co-creator Stephen Merchant

Seth Meyers tells the story of his second son's dramatic birth in his Netflix stand-up special<em> Lobby Baby.</em>
David Schnack
/
Netflix
Seth Meyers tells the story of his second son's dramatic birth in his Netflix stand-up special Lobby Baby.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Too scared or not scared enough? Seth Meyers explores our relationship with fear: Meyers has satirized issues in the news ever since he became an anchor on SNL's "Weekend Update" segment in 2006. Now he has a new children's book about fear — and how we acknowledge or ignore it.

Beyoncé and Wet Leg top Ken Tucker's round-up of 2022's best music: Beyoncé's album Renaissance celebrates disco rhythms and club culture, while the self-titled album by the Isle of Wight duo Wet Leg features intense, punk-influenced pop.

British 'Office' co-creator Stephen Merchant isn't afraid to fuse comedy with tragedy: Merchant's new series, The Outlaws, follows low-level offenders who've been assigned community service. It was inspired in part by his parents, who supervised community service in Bristol, England.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

Too scared or not scared enough? Seth Meyers explores our relationship with fear

Beyoncé and Wet Leg top Ken Tucker's round-up of 2022's best music

British 'Office' co-creator Stephen Merchant isn't afraid to fuse comedy with tragedy

Copyright 2022 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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