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New Haven police officers blame EMTs for Randy Cox's injuries

 New Haven Police Department officers move Richard "Randy" Cox from a police transport van to a wheelchair after he suffered severe injuries leaving him paralyzed when the van had to make a sudden stop for an oncoming driver.
New Haven Police Department
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NHPD
New Haven Police Department officers move Richard "Randy" Cox from a police transport van to a wheelchair after he suffered severe injuries leaving him paralyzed when the van had to make a sudden stop for an oncoming driver.

The five New Haven police officers who have been sued by Randy Cox for injuries that left him paralyzed have filed court papers blaming the EMTs who treated Cox.

The officers claim the two EMTs from American Medical Response “misrepresented” Cox’s inability to move, and failed to intervene in the field by allowing the officers to move Cox from his holding cell to a stretcher.

Cox was taken into custody on June 19 and placed in the back of a police van. The van stopped short, and he hit his head. When he told the officers that he couldn’t move, they dragged him by his ankles to a wheelchair to take him to his cell.

Cox is seeking $100 million in damages, and New Haven is negotiating a settlement. The five officers have also been charged with reckless endangerment and cruelty to persons.

Terry Sheridan is a Peabody-nominated, award-winning journalist. As Senior Director of News and Education, he developed a unique and award-winning internship program with the Stony Brook University School of Communications and Journalism, where he is also a lecturer and adjunct professor. He also mentors graduate fellows from the Sacred Heart University Graduate School of Communication, Media and the Arts.

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