© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Take a look at the image people voted to award Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Sascha Fonseca captured this image during a three-year bait-free camera-trap project in Leh, Ladakh, India, high in the Indian Himalayas. Because of their remote habitat, they  are one of the most difficult large cats to photograph in the wild.
Sascha Fonseca
/
Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Sascha Fonseca captured this image during a three-year bait-free camera-trap project in Leh, Ladakh, India, high in the Indian Himalayas. Because of their remote habitat, they are one of the most difficult large cats to photograph in the wild.

A photo of a snow leopard on the icy cliffs of northern India has won the people's choice award for the 58th annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year People's Choice Award, the Natural History Museum in London announced Thursday.

Sascha Fonseca's "World of the snow leopard" won first prize out of a pool of 25 shortlisted images, racking up the majority of votes from 60,466 people.

Fonseca, of Germany, set up a bait-free camera trap three years ago in the Indian Himalayas, in the territory of Ladakh.

"I'm incredibly proud to be the winner of this year's People's Choice Award and I thank all the supporters around the world for making this happen," Fonseca said. "Photography can connect people to wildlife and encourage them to appreciate the beauty of the unseen natural world."

Snow leopards, like many big cats, can be quite elusive and are great at camouflaging. There are only about 6,500 left in the wild, due to threats from poaching, habitat loss and conflict with humans.

Fonseca's photo will be displayed at the Natural History Museum, which develops and produces the competition, until July 2.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Corrected: February 9, 2023 at 12:00 AM EST
An earlier version of this story misnamed the museum bestowing this award as the National History Museum.
Ayana Archie

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content