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A dog named Buddy Holly wins best in show at Westminster, a first for his breed

Handler Janice Hays poses for photos with Buddy Holly, a petit basset griffon Vendéen, after he won best in show during the 147th Westminster Kennel Club Dog show Tuesday, May 9, 2023, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York.
Mary Altaffer
/
AP
Handler Janice Hays poses for photos with Buddy Holly, a petit basset griffon Vendéen, after he won best in show during the 147th Westminster Kennel Club Dog show Tuesday, May 9, 2023, at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York.

A petit basset griffon Vendéen named Buddy Holly won best in show at this year's Westminster Kennel Club dog show on Tuesday, a first for his breed.

The 6-year-old bested six other finalists, including Rummie the Pekingese, Winston the French bulldog, Ribbon the Australian shepherd, Cider the English setter, Monty the giant schnauzer and Trouble the American Staffordshire terrier.

"I never thought a PBGV would do this," handler and co-owner Janice Hayes said, referring to the acronym for the dog breed. "Buddy Holly is the epitome of a show dog."

PBGVs belong to the hound group. They are from the French region of Vendée, known for their rabbit-hunting abilities and "a happy demeanor and durable constitution," the American Kennel Club says.

They typically get along well with other dogs and small children, according to the AKC.

To be a finalist for best in show, a participant has to first be the top dog in its breed, and then win its group, such as hounds or terriers.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Ayana Archie

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