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Sunday Puzzle: A Lesson In Geography...

Sunday Puzzle
NPR
Sunday Puzzle

On-air challenge: I'm going to read you some sentences. Each sentence ends in the name of a state. Think of a major city in the state that rhymes with one of the words in the sentence.

Ex. The couple plan to marry in Indiana. --> GARY

1. Mother went to a noisy party in Idaho.

2. Friends plan to build a fancy palace in Texas.

3. Certain highways need patches in Mississippi.

4. There's a lot of dealing with chicken and dairy in West Virginia.

5. The diners needed Beano after eating in Nevada.

6. Party people are dancing in Michigan.

7. A jury foreman was chosen in Oklahoma.

8. My older brother lives in Colorado.

9. The Lenten season was noted in New Jersey.

10. Our family collie came from North Carolina.

11. The wedding guests are staying at Radisson hotels in Wisconsin.


Last week's challenge: Last week's challenge comes from listener Chad Graham, of Philadelphia. Name a famous singer (6,4). Remove the last letter of the first name and the first letter of the last name. The result, reading left to right, is a word for some singing. What was it?

Challenge answer: Carole King --> caroling

Winner: Deana Peck of Phoenix, Arizona.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Rawson Scheinberg, of Northville, Mich. Name a famous singer (6,6) whose last name is a body of water. And if you remove a letter from the first name you'll get a landform. What singer is this?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to the challenge, submit it here by Thursday, June 15th at 3 p.m. ET. Listeners whose answers are selected win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: include a phone number where we can reach you.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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