© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Mass. soon will end its housing guarantee for families in state shelter system

Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey declares a state of emergency Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2023 in Boston, citing the influx of migrants to the state in need of shelter. Healey said there are nearly 5,600 families or more than 20,000 individuals – many of whom are migrants -- currently living in state shelter across Massachusetts. That's up from around 3,100 families a year ago, about an 80 percent increase. (AP Photo/Steve LeBlanc)
Steve LeBlanc
/
AP
Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey declares a state of emergency Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2023 in Boston, citing the influx of migrants to the state in need of shelter. Healey said there are nearly 5,600 families or more than 20,000 individuals – many of whom are migrants -- currently living in state shelter across Massachusetts. That's up from around 3,100 families a year ago, about an 80 percent increase. (AP Photo/Steve LeBlanc)

Massachusetts will soon end its guarantee to shelter families in need, as the state's system is overwhelmed by the record number of unhoused families seeking shelter, Gov. Maura Healey announced Monday.

When the state family shelter system hits 7,500 households, Healey said the state will no longer guarantee placements — even for eligible families.

As of Monday, there are 6,945 families in the state-funded family shelter system. The state expects to hit the 7,500 cap by the end of the month. Healey said that after it hits the new limit, the state will create a waitlist and families with health and safety risks will be prioritized for housing.

"Today, we can share that our shelter system is on the verge of reaching capacity," Healey said, speaking at a press conference Monday morning. "Especially with winter approaching, we need everyone to understand that we are entering a new phase of this challenge. We can no longer guarantee shelter placement for families."

Healey said she is appointing Lieutenant General Leon Scott Rice to direct the state's family shelter system. In a statement, she said, he will be responsible for "implementing this new phase of the emergency shelter system" and coordinating those efforts with local, state and federal officials.

The state’s family shelter system dates back to a 1983 law which obligates the state to provide shelter for all eligible families. The caseload has varied over the years, but this year, the state has seen record-breaking growth in its family shelter population.

One of the driving factors has been the number of migrant families arriving in Massachusetts in need of housing. Many of these families are originally from Haiti but have spent years traveling through South America, often stopping elsewhere in the U.S. before coming to the commonwealth.

“This is a federal problem that demands a federal solution,” said Healey.

In August, Healey declared a state of emergency over the situation. The state has run out of traditional shelter units and about 3,200 of the families currently in the shelter system reside in overflow hotels and motels rented by the state, with more than 1,000 households in unstaffed motels and hotels aided by National Guard members.

Healey also announced her administration has asked the federal government to set up larger sites to shelter families. She added Massachusetts also will expand its effort to find people in the system jobs so they can move out of the shelter system and into more permanent housing. The average length of state in the system is over a year.

"The federal government must meet its emergency management responsibilities directly. It will need to establish larger sites where more families can be sheltered and provided with basic necessities," she said. "This is something that has been done before in similar moments, and it must be done again."

This story was originally published by WBUR. It was shared as part of the New England News Collaborative.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content