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Arts & Culture

Connecticut Legends & Lore

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Credit Sean MacEntee, Flickr Creative Commons
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Ok, Ok, you're a super-rational public radio listener but you live in a place drenched in supernatural legend. In fact, historians like David Hall and David Hackett-Fischer have argued that the new world was imbued with notions of magic and superstition from Jumpstreet. One of the paradoxes of the Puritan migration was that even as they imported a belief system that rejected popish superstition in favor of what they saw as leaner, cleaner Calvinist faith, they somehow also brought all kinds of magical nuttiness. And, you could say it never left. 

Today, we hear from three historians and folklorists who have collected supernatural legends about the places you walk and drive by, because it's Halloween. So, loosen up Mr. Hyperrational.

Comment below, email Colin@wnpr.org, or tweet @wnprcolin.

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Betsy started as an intern at WNPR in 2011 after earning a Master's Degree in American and Museum Studies from Trinity College. She served as the Senior Producer for 'The Colin McEnroe Show' for several years before stepping down in 2021 and returning to her previous career as a registered nurse. She still produces shows with Colin and the team when her schedule allows.

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