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Cancer Answers is hosted by Dr. Anees Chagpar, Associate Professor of Surgical Oncology and Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Dr. Francine Foss, Professor of Medical Oncology. The show features a guest cancer specialist who will share the most recent advances in cancer therapy and respond to listeners questions. Myths, facts and advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment are discussed, with a different focus eachweek. Nationally acclaimed specialists in various types of cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment discuss common misconceptions about the disease and respond to questions from the community.Listeners can submit questions to be answered on the program at canceranswers@yale.edu or by leaving a message at (888) 234-4YCC. As a resource, archived programs from 2006 through the present are available in both audio and written versions on the Yale Cancer Center website.

The Passion of Pickling

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Chion Wolf, filtered through Instagram
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WNPR

In 2030 B.C., somebody brought cucumbers from India to the Tigris Valley, and they said, "We can pickle that!" And so it began, from the first stirrings of civilization, to modern-day Brooklyn artisan pickles: we've found ourselves up to our eyes in brine, looking for the next object we can pickle.

Within half a mile of each other in Brooklyn, New York, are Crock & Jar, and Brooklyn Brine.

At Crock & Jar, food preservationist Michaela Hayes is a disciple of the growing lacto-fermentation movement, which creates what you would call a pickled product through a slightly different process. Fermentation is the new pickling, and the people who do it consider it not only tasty but important for the health of your gut.

Over at Brooklyn Brine, they make four types of pickles plus pickled asparagus, beets, carrots and sauerkraut. They are famed for their whiskey sour pickles made with Finger Lakes Distilling McKenzie Rye Whiskey.

Those are just two points of light in a vast constellation of artisanal pickling. Pickling was ancient man's answer to the question, "what if I want to eat this later?" Now it's haute cuisine and a running gag about artisanal culture.

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