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Arts & Culture

The Agony and Utility of Ecstasy

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Chion Wolf
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WNPR
C. Michael White is a Professor and Department Head at UConn’s School of Pharmacy.";
Ecstasy_monogram.jpg
Credit Wikimedia Commons
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Tablets containing MDMA.

"Molly" is the nickname for MDMA, or Ecstasy, and it's short for "Molecule", meaning you're getting the "real thing", chemically speaking. Except you almost never do. On this show, we'll talk about the dangers of Molly, the medical uses of MDMA, and the curious romance between the drug and the form of music known as EDM, Electronic Dance Music.

**This show originally aired on November 21st, 2013***

What do you think? Comment below, tweet @wnprcolin, or email Colin@wnpr.org.

GUESTS:

  • C. Michael White  is a Professor and Department Head at UConn’s School of Pharmacy
  • Dr. John Halpern is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School
  • Brad Burge is the Director of Comm. with the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS)
  • Sam Tracy is the Chairman of the Board for Students for Sensible Drug Policy in Washington, DC
  • Tommie Sunshine is a music producer, journalist and DJ

Tags
Arts & Culture drugsmusicdance
Chion Wolf is the host of the radio show and podcast 'Audacious' on Connecticut Public.

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