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Arts & Culture

Plan Would Limit, But Not Eliminate, Carriage Horses in New York City

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A new plan is being discussed to reduce the number of -- but not eliminate -- horse carriages on New York City.

Mayor Bill de Blasio promised to ban the practice. He said it's too dangerous for the animals to be on Manhattan's busy streets.

Activists who support a ban spent more than $1 million attacking de Blasio's 2013 opponent, Christine Quinn.

But the move to ban the industry stalled.

 

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The drivers, with support from newspaper editorial boards, denounced the ban and many City Council members expressed reservations.

 

The new plan, which was first reported Tuesday in The New York Times, would restrict the horses to Central Park and reduce the number from 220 to about 70.

It's not clear if the City Council might vote on any horse carriage legislation.

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