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Being Prepared: Boy Scouts in the 21st Century

Everybody knows the Boy Scouts. They're the scouts who don't sell cookies. (That's the Girl Scouts.) But for more than a century the Boy Scouts have been an organization devoted to, in their own words, keeping boys "physically fit, mentally awake, and morally straight."

Of course, exactly what that means and what that entails has been up for debate and has changed over the years. For some people, their time in Scouts was among the best experiences of their life. For others, well, it's something they try to repress.

This hour, a look at the Boy Scouts, good and bad, past, present, and future.

GUESTS:

  • Rasheed Ali - Scoutmaster of Troop 8 in Hartford
  • Robin Bossert - Founder and executive director of Navigators USA
  • Benjamin Jordan - Professor of history at Christian Brothers University and the author of Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America
  • Brad Mead - Scoutmaster of Troop 175 in Simsbury

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Alex Dueben is a freelance writer who lives in Hartford.

Colin McEnroe and Chion Wolf contributed to this show.

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Jonathan is a producer for ‘The Colin McEnroe Show.’ His work has been heard nationally on NPR and locally on Connecticut Public’s talk shows and news magazines. He’s as likely to host a podcast on minor league baseball as he is to cover a presidential debate almost by accident. Jonathan can be reached at jmcnicol@ctpublic.org.

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