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Health
Cancer Answers is hosted by Dr. Anees Chagpar, Associate Professor of Surgical Oncology and Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Dr. Francine Foss, Professor of Medical Oncology. The show features a guest cancer specialist who will share the most recent advances in cancer therapy and respond to listeners questions. Myths, facts and advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment are discussed, with a different focus eachweek. Nationally acclaimed specialists in various types of cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment discuss common misconceptions about the disease and respond to questions from the community.Listeners can submit questions to be answered on the program at canceranswers@yale.edu or by leaving a message at (888) 234-4YCC. As a resource, archived programs from 2006 through the present are available in both audio and written versions on the Yale Cancer Center website.

How Much Water Do You Need?

water_ian_sane.jpg
Ian Sane
/
Creative Commons

Most of us have heard that our bodies need eight cups of water every day to stay healthy and hydrated. Some think that's the minimum we should drink to prevent the chronic dehydration that doesn't trigger the usual warnings of dryness, like thirst.  

But some experts are pushing back on this rule, saying there is little science to back up the claim. They say we need drink only when we're thirsty since our bodies are good at telling us what we need. Plus, some studies show a little dehydration may improve athletic performance. 

The reality is no one really knows how much water we need. We do know that water makes up half our weight; keeps our cells, kidneys and cardiovascular system finely tuned; and may have a role in protecting us from some illnesses. We can survive without food far longer than we can go without water. It is safe to say that water is one of the most important elements to life.

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Colin McEnroe, Chion Wolf, and Greg Hill contributed to this show.

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