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The Continuum of Racism in America

In the wake of another mass shooting, President Barack Obama took the podium in the White House press briefing room to address reporters. The shooting in a black church brings up a "dark part" of United States history. "This is not the first time that black churches have been attacked, and we know the hatred across races and faiths pose a particular threat to our democracy and our ideals," Obama said.

This hour, we explore several threads of the post-Charleston shooting, from the symbols of racism to the use of mental health to explain tragedy.

GUESTS:

  • Khalilah Brown-Dean - Associate professor of political science at Quinnipiac University
  • Maurie McInnis - Professor of art history at the University of Virginia and author of Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade
  • Chris Rabb - Social Impact Fellow at the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute at Temple's Fox School of Business, genealogist, and a 1992 graduate of Yale
  • Arthur Chu - Freelance columnist who's work appears in The Daily Beast and Salon

MUSIC:

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Colin McEnroe and Chion Wolf contributed to this show.

Tucker Ives is WNPR's morning news producer.

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