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Fifteen Years After 9/11: Stories of Loss, Pain, and Forgiveness

Ryan Caron King
/
WNPR
Rais Bhuiyan.

This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. This hour, we hear from two people whose lives were forever changed by the tragedy. 

First, Bangladeshi immigrant Rais Bhuiyansurvived a hate crime fueled by anti-Muslim sentiment after 9/11. His second chance at life led him to create a non-profit dedicated to the act of compassion and forgiveness. We hear his story. Watch part of our interview with Bhuiyan below:

We also hear from New Canaan resident and mother Mary Fetchet. She remembers her son Brad, a 24-year-old equity trader who died while working in the World Trade Center. 

Event info:

On Monday, September 12, 2016, Voices of September 11th and Grace Farms will co-host “VOICES Public Discourse Initiative: Commemorating the 15th Anniversary; Remembrance, Renewal, and Resilience.” For more information, click here.

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Ryan Caron King and Jeff Tyson contributed to this show.

Lucy leads Connecticut Public's strategies to deeply connect and build collaborations with community-focused organizations across the state.

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