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Emily Sweeney finishes women's singles luge with best time of three runs

U.S. luger Emily Sweeney suffered a devastating crash four years ago at the Olympics in South Korea. "I broke my neck and my back, and I came back and I'm here," she said in Beijing.
Emily Russell
/
North Country Public Radio
U.S. luger Emily Sweeney suffered a devastating crash four years ago at the Olympics in South Korea. "I broke my neck and my back, and I came back and I'm here," she said in Beijing.

On Tuesday, Suffield’s Emily Sweeney finished competition in the women’s luge at the Beijing Winter Olympics with her best run of the event.

The slider finished 26th after a crash in a run earlier in the week put her behind. Sweeney had the 10th best time in Monday’s opening run. Her final run was almost a tenth of a second faster – just not enough to overcome Monday’s second-run crash.

“That was hard. So tomorrow I’ll hit the reset button,” Sweeney said Monday to a reporter who asked her about getting back on the sled for another run Tuesday despite being well off the pace.

“Right now, it’s just a tough one,” she said.

Sweeny’s return to the Olympics comes after a horrific crash in the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. There, she broke her neck and back. She has told reporters that she couldn’t walk for two months after that crash.

There is one more sliding competition Sweeney could compete in: the luge team relay on Thursday. But she’d have to be picked by coaches over all the other women’s singles competitors on Team USA.

If you read any of Frankie Graziano’s previous biographies, they’d be all about his passion for sports. But times change – and he’s a family man now.

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