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Artists at New Haven’s NXTHVN open their studios this weekend

Artist Edgar Serrano works in his studio at NXTHVN.
John Dennis
/
Provided photograph / NXTHVN
Artist Edgar Serrano works in his studio at NXTHVN.

It’s one thing to see a great work of art. But seeing that art as it’s being created is next-level, and that’s the whole idea behind NXTHVN’s annual Open Studios weekend.

“Anyone that comes will have the opportunity to visit the studios, ask questions to the artist and just get a sense of what it means to be a studio fellow here at NXTHVN,” said programs manager Victoria McCraven. “But also what it means to be a professional artist, particularly an emerging artist.”

Open Studios weekend will also include tours of the New Haven facility and activities for kids, including a building-wide scavenger hunt.

“It’s really an opportunity to connect with arts professionals,” McCraven said. “It’s an opportunity for inspiration and to support artists that are looking to advance their careers.”

NXTHVN is a unique arts program in New Haven’s Dixwell neighborhood that not only sustains a cohort of up-and-coming artists and curators financially, but also helps to accelerate their careers through mentorship and professional development opportunities. The program also offers talented high school students a paid apprenticeship program.

NXTHVN’s Open Studios weekend is Saturday, April 15, and Sunday, April 16, from 1 to 5 pm.

Artist Donald Guevara works in his studio at NXTHVN.
John Dennis
/
Provided photograph / NXTHVN
Artist Donald Guevara works in his studio at NXTHVN.

Ray Hardman is Connecticut Public’s Arts and Culture Reporter. He is the host of CPTV’s Emmy-nominated original series Where Art Thou? Listeners to Connecticut Public Radio may know Ray as the local voice of Morning Edition, and later of All Things Considered.

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