© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY
WECS · WEDW-FM · WNPR · WPKT · WRLI-FM · WVOF
Public Files Contact · ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Five CT communities receive additional affordable housing funding

Construction workers on the job at the Colonial Village public housing complex in Norwalk, where 200 apartments are being renovated and 69 more will be built. After spending years to get local zoning approval, the project is now waiting on state funding to move forward. Every year, state legislators earmark millions of dollars to build new affordable housing. But as the housing market has heated up, Connecticut Public’s Accountability Project has found there’s a $450 million pot of money that hasn’t been spent.
Ryan Caron King
/
Connecticut Public
Construction workers on the job at the Colonial Village public housing complex in Norwalk, where 200 apartments are being renovated and 69 more will be built. After spending years to get local zoning approval, the project is now waiting on state funding to move forward. Every year, state legislators earmark millions of dollars to build new affordable housing. But as the housing market has heated up, Connecticut Public’s Accountability Project has found there’s a $450 million pot of money that hasn’t been spent.

As the housing crisis continues across Connecticut, due in part to the lack of new housing inventory, the state Department of Housing announced $23.2 million in additional funding to create hundreds of affordable apartments.

The funding will go towards the construction of 225 new affordable apartment units in Norwalk, Madison, East Hartford, Salisbury and Montville. The additional money from the state allocated for the projects will help the projects proceed.

“DOH is working tirelessly to get more affordable housing units online as quickly as possible,” DOH Commissioner Seila Mosquera-Bruno said. “We’re working with housing authorities and developers across Connecticut to get their projects to the point where shovels are going into the ground.”

Not every unit constructed with the funds will be designated affordable, but a portion of each project will be reserved for low-income residents.

A 69-unit affordable housing development, spread across 18 buildings, will be constructed in Norwalk, using $5.8 million in state funding.

The DOH application process to receive the dollars was extensive, Norwalk Housing Authority Executive Director Adam Bovislky said.

“They want to understand the plan. They understand the financing. They want to know who it's going to help. They look at the neighborhood it's in, they look at just about just about everything, the details of the architectural drawings are all a required part of that, of that process,” Bovilsky said.

The Oak Grove Apartments and Learning Center will be developed by the Norwalk Housing Authority and Heritage Housing on a nearly 8-acre plot owned by the Authority.

Construction will take about 14 months, Bovilsky said.

In Montville, $6 million will fund the historic restoration and conversion of an early 20th century historic mill into 57 affordable housing units. In Salisbury, 10 apartments will be constructed with about $3.4 million in DOH dollars.

Twenty-four and 50 affordable units will be made in Madison and East Hartford, respectively.

Abigail is Connecticut Public's housing reporter, covering statewide housing developments and issues, with an emphasis on Fairfield County communities. She received her master's from Columbia University in 2020 and graduated from the University of Connecticut in 2019. Abigail previously covered statewide transportation and the city of Norwalk for Hearst Connecticut Media. She loves all things Disney and cats.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content