© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY
WECS · WEDW-FM · WNPR · WPKT · WRLI-FM · WVOF
Public Files Contact · ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

New Haven receives federal grant for home lead paint removal

New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker (center) joined other city, state, and federal officials in front of a home recently abated for lead to announce a HUD grant that will give $7.7 million to the city to remediate lead paint from 200 housing units.
Ryan Caron King
/
Connecticut Public
New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker (center) joined other city, state, and federal officials in front of a home recently abated for lead to announce a HUD grant that will give $7.7 million to the city to remediate lead paint from 200 housing units.

Over 80% of homes in New Haven homes may have lead paint on the interior or exterior.

The city is now bolstering its efforts to remove lead paint from hundreds of homes.

New Haven received $7.7 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Lead-Based-Paint Hazard Reduction (LHR) Grant Program.

“This grant will allow us to bolster our current efforts to eliminate lead hazards and an additional 200 housing units to train and certify over 130 contractors, maintenance workers and property owners,” New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker said. “So we have more people that can actually do this work, and engage in a robust education campaign.”

Residents who are having lead removed from their homes are being temporarily housed for free in a nearby hotel.

The largest threat lead paint proposes is accidental ingestion by children. They often consume the decaying paint through soil outside of the home, according to New Haven Environmental Health Director Rafael Ramos.

“If you live in a home, built prior to 1978, we can suspect that there may be lead in that home somewhere. However, the lead in the paint is not the issue, it's the condition of the paint,” Ramos said. “If you live in a home built prior to 1978, and your paint is starting to become defective, particularly if you have children, be aware.”

Lead poisoning can stunt children’s brain and intellectual development. Teachers and families may be unaware the child consumed it, Sen. Richard Blumenthal said.

“When teachers say, 'O h, you know, Johnny is slow.' Nobody's told the teacher Johnny ate lead or is eating lead. And that's the reason that his brain may be working slower,” Blumenthal said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports blood tests are the best way to detect whether a child has been exposed to lead.

The city of New Haven has removed lead paint from 251 homes since the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program began in 2019. It started with a similar $5.6 million HUD grant.

Abigail is Connecticut Public's housing reporter, covering statewide housing developments and issues, with an emphasis on Fairfield County communities. She received her master's from Columbia University in 2020 and graduated from the University of Connecticut in 2019. Abigail previously covered statewide transportation and the city of Norwalk for Hearst Connecticut Media. She loves all things Disney and cats.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content