© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY
WECS · WEDW-FM · WNPR · WPKT · WRLI-FM · WVOF
Public Files Contact · ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

CT part of $700 million Google app store settlement

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong speaks during a press conference on the multi-state $700 million dollar antitrust settlement with Google at the Office of the Attorney General in Hartford, Connecticut December 19, 2023.
Matt Dwyer
/
Connecticut Public
Connecticut Attorney General William Tong speaks during a press conference on the multi-state $700 million dollar antitrust settlement with Google at the Office of the Attorney General in Hartford, Connecticut December 19, 2023.

Connecticut is part of a multi-state $700 million dollar antitrust settlement with Google.

A group of states had accused the giant online company of using its Android app store to stifle competition and charge high fees on purchases made through its Play Store.

Details of the deal were announced Tuesday.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said until now, if you had an Android phone and you wanted to download an app, you had to go through Google’s Play Store.

"Google has dominated that space through restrictive contracts, through technological barriers, and basically, 'You play by our rules or you don't play at all,'" Tong said. "And that impacts customer choice, app choice, and price."

Tong says under the provisions of the settlement, Google will allow more competition to its Play Store. Most of the money Google is paying will be sent back to customers who made purchases on their phones or other devices through the Play Store.

It was not immediately clear how much of the money would go to customers in Connecticut.

Eligible consumers will receive at least $2, according to the settlement, and may get additional payments based on their spending on the Play store between Aug. 16, 2016 and Sept. 30, 2023. The estimated 102 million U.S. consumers who made in-app purchases during that time frame are supposed to be automatically notified about various options for how they can receive their cut of the money.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Matt Dwyer is an editor, reporter and midday host for Connecticut Public's news department. He produces local news during All Things Considered.

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.