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Hartford police announce charges for 13 members of organized crime group based in city

The “Get Money Steppas” operated throughout New England, but were based in Hartford's south end, according to police.
Tyler Russell
/
Connecticut Public
The “Get Money Steppas” operated throughout New England, but were based in Hartford's south end, according to police.

Thirteen alleged members of a Hartford organized crime group have been arrested, law enforcement officials announced Wednesday.

The “Get Money Steppas” operated throughout New England, but were based in Hartford's south end, according to police.

The group was responsible for murders, auto thefts, arson, drug dealing and crimes involving heavy firepower, officials said.

“Altered weapons, fully automatic weapons, ghost guns, hundred-rounds-plus fired per incident," Hartford Police Chief Jason Thody said. "Those are dangerous situations in a city like Hartford.”

The suspects face organized crime and racketeering charges.

The arrests were the result of an 11-month investigation involving local, state and federal law enforcement, Thody said.

“These are some uniquely violent individuals that were responsible for creating dangerous conditions in the city, and that required a specific response from us,” Thody said.

Eight of the 13 suspects were already in custody on other charges, officials said. The remaining five were taken into custody by both Hartford police and U.S. Marshals.

The suspects are being charged under Connecticut’s organized crime and racketeering statute.

More charges and arrests are expected in the investigation, which began in May of last year, police said.

Chris Polansky joined Connecticut Public in March 2023 as a general assignment and breaking news reporter based in Hartford. Previously, he’s worked at Utah Public Radio in Logan, Utah, as a general assignment reporter; Lehigh Valley Public Media in Bethlehem, Pa., as an anchor and producer for All Things Considered; and at Public Radio Tulsa in Tulsa, Okla., where he both reported and hosted Morning Edition.

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