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Police: Man’s body found more than 1 year after death

EAST HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — An elderly man’s body was found inside a Connecticut home more than a year after his death — a discovery prompted by a call to a funeral home asking about arranging services for someone who died in April 2021, police said Thursday.

The dead man’s name, how he died and why his death was not reported sooner were not immediately disclosed. An autopsy was planned Thursday.

Authorities said officers found the body Tuesday in East Haven after police got a call from the East Haven Memorial Funeral Home, which reported the odd phone conversation.

The caller did not mention the deceased’s name or location. When told that police should be contacted, the caller hung up, officials said.

While police were trying to determine that caller’s identity, dispatchers received another call from someone who asked about having a coroner come to a house in East Haven.

Police then went to the home, where the body was in an advanced stage of decomposition in a bedroom, authorities said.

Police said the person who called asking about a coroner was the dead man’s son, who is cooperating in the investigation.

Police are determining whether criminal charges are warranted.

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