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Episode 5: Teenagers carry the stories of slavery forward

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The ongoing efforts of Dennis Culliton (above) and The Witness Stones Project have placed at least 200 memorials honoring enslaved people at sites around Connecticut and the Northeast. Citing the 1790 census, Culliton says there were enslaved people in every town in Connecticut.
Ryan Caron King
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Connecticut Public
The ongoing efforts of Dennis Culliton (above) and The Witness Stones Project have placed at least 200 memorials honoring enslaved people at sites around Connecticut and the Northeast. Citing the 1790 census, Culliton says there were enslaved people in every town in Connecticut.

Experts, historians and volunteers have been uncovering Connecticut’s ties to slavery. It’s one thing to unearth this forgotten history, but how do we not forget it? Meet some of the people working with students to make sure that the stories of enslaved Connecticut residents endure. The Witness Stones Project helps schools and local communities “restore the history and honor the humanity” of enslaved people who helped build Connecticut. What happened centuries ago matters today, the students say.

In our final episode, reporter/producer Diane Orson and editorial consultant and curator Frank Mitchell ask: How do we not forget this history? Mitchell discusses ways communities can reimagine their built environment to bring forward these stories. Mitchell also shares his hope that institutions of privilege will partner with community members to memorialize this history together.

Click here to learn more, including videos, photos and digital stories.

Support the project at ctpublic.org/donate

This podcast was produced by Cassandra Basler.

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