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Denise Merrill On The Future of Voting in Connecticut

Official Ballot Boxes outside West Hartford Town Hall.
Ali Oshinskie
/
Connecticut Public Radio
Official Ballot Boxes outside West Hartford Town Hall.

More than a third of Connecticut votes cast in the November 2020 election were by absentee ballot.  Will ballot drop boxes and mail-in options become permanent? Today, we talk with Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill about the future of voting in Connecticut.

And later: President Biden has been in office for less than a month. But he’s already setting records with his use of executive orders. We hear from a law professor about what this use of executive power means for the country.

GUESTS:

  • Denise Merrill - Connecticut Secretary of the State
  • Kelly Moore- Policy Counsel at the ACLU of Connecticut
  • Cristina Rodriguez - Professor at Yale Law School

Cat Pastor contributed to this show.

Lucy leads Connecticut Public's strategies to deeply connect and build collaborations with community-focused organizations across the state.
Carmen Baskauf was a producer for Connecticut Public Radio's news-talk show Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil from 2017-2021. She has also contributed to The Colin McEnroe Show.

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