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What will AAPI studies look like in Connecticut's schools?

A group of students sitting at desks inside a classroom.
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Getty Images
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Last year, Connecticut became one of the first states to mandate Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in K-12 public schools.

The bill requires AAPI studies to be implemented in the state curriculum by the 2025-26 school year. It also provides about $150,000 in state funding to support these efforts. School districts will incorporate a wide range of topics into their curricula, from AAPI history to AAPI involvement in the arts.

So where does the development of this curriculum stand right now? This hour, we check in on that.

Plus, we get the latest on legislation inspired by Randy Cox, who was paralyzed at the hands of police. We also look at the 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act.

GUESTS:

  • Jason Oliver Chang: Professor of History and Asian and Asian American Studies, UCONN
  • Eddy Martinez: Reporter, Connecticut Public
  • William Buzbee: Professor and Faculty Director of the Environmental Law & Policy Program, Georgetown University Law Center

The Wheelhouse is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode.

Frankie Graziano is the host of <i>The Wheelhouse</i>, focusing on how local and national politics impact the people of Connecticut.
Meg Dalton is the deputy director of storytelling for Connecticut Public. She previously worked for The Takeaway from WNYC, in collaboration with GBH and PRX, and Mobituaries with Mo Rocca. She's also reported and edited for the Columbia Journalism Review, PBS NewsHour, Slate, MediaShift, Hearst Connecticut newspapers, and more. Her audio work has appeared on ‎WNYC, WSHU, Marketplace, WBAI, and NPR. She earned her master's degree from Columbia Journalism School in 2017, where she specialized in audio storytelling and narrative writing, and has taught audio storytelling at Columbia Journalism School, UnionDocs, and public libraries.