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Some politicians are using Holocaust analogies as anti-vaccine rhetoric

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's new exhibit, "Americans and the Holocaust," surfaces the complexity of national attitudes and concerns that weighed heavily on the nation's role during the Holocaust.
Eslah Attar/NPR
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's new exhibit, "Americans and the Holocaust," surfaces the complexity of national attitudes and concerns that weighed heavily on the nation's role during the Holocaust.

Republican state representative, Anne Dauphinais recently criticized Governor Lamont over his vaccine and mask mandates comparing him to Adolf Hitler.

She’s not the first politician to reference Nazi Germany and the Holocaust to criticize public health rules in the pandemic.

Today, we talk about why these analogies are harmful. Avinoam Patt, Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life at the University of Connecticut joins us.

Do these references and jokes in popular culture point to the need for better Holocaust education?

Later, we’re going to talk about a really interesting story that brought an anthropologist and an archaeologist together after Superstorm Sandy. To learn more about this story, register for this free virtual event “Forensic Analysis of the Lincoln Oak Skeletal Remains,” hosted by the New Haven Museum.

GUESTS:

  • Dr. Avinoam Patt - Director for the Center of Judaic Studies at the University of Connecticut. He is also the Doris and Simon Konover Chair of Judaic Studies
  • Dr. Nick Bellantoni - emeritus, Connecticut State Archaeologist
  • Dr. Gary Aronsen - research associate and manager at Yale University Biological Anthropology Laboratories
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