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Fresh Air Weekend: Andrew Scott; How cars became a gendered technology

Andrew Scott as Tom Ripley.
Philippe Antonello
/
Netflix
Andrew Scott as Tom Ripley.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Don't call him a sociopath: Here's how Andrew Scott humanizes 'Ripley': Scott (who you may know as "hot priest" from Fleabag) plays con man Tom Ripley in the Netflix adaptation of The Talented Mr. Ripley. He says his job is to advocate for his characters, not judge them.

Contrarian Lionel Shriver deftly satirizes anti-intellectualism in 'Mania': Shriver's new novel is one of her best. It takes place in an alternative America, where the last acceptable bias — discrimination against people considered not so smart — is being stamped out.

'Women Behind the Wheel' explains how cars became a gendered technology: Author Nancy Nichols says that for men, cars signify adventure, power and strength. For women, they are about performing domestic duties; there was even a minivan prototype with a washer/dryer inside.

You can listen to the original interviews and review here:

Don't call him a sociopath: Here's how Andrew Scott humanizes 'Ripley'

Contrarian Lionel Shriver deftly satirizes anti-intellectualism in 'Mania'

'Women Behind the Wheel' explains how cars became a gendered technology:

Copyright 2024 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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