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Cancer Answers is hosted by Dr. Anees Chagpar, Associate Professor of Surgical Oncology and Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Dr. Francine Foss, Professor of Medical Oncology. The show features a guest cancer specialist who will share the most recent advances in cancer therapy and respond to listeners questions. Myths, facts and advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment are discussed, with a different focus eachweek. Nationally acclaimed specialists in various types of cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment discuss common misconceptions about the disease and respond to questions from the community.Listeners can submit questions to be answered on the program at canceranswers@yale.edu or by leaving a message at (888) 234-4YCC. As a resource, archived programs from 2006 through the present are available in both audio and written versions on the Yale Cancer Center website.

Yale Promises 300 Beds For First Responders - After Mayor's Public Shaming

Frankie Graziano
/
Connecticut Public Radio
Yale University

Yale University President Peter Salovey announced Saturday that the university will make available 300 beds to house “first responders and hospital personnel,” one day after Mayor Justin Elicker publicly lambasted the university for turning down his request to help house local firefighters and police officers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“Yesterday, New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker expressed frustration with Yale University’s lack of a swift positive response to his request for the university to provide housing for first responders to COVID-19,” Salovey said in an online statement published Saturday afternoon.

“We are eager to help New Haven with this need. We have been working to make this possible—and we agree that we should move as quickly as we can, in service of people doing extraordinary work on behalf of the New Haven community.

“Toward that end, we will make 300 beds available by the end of this coming week to first responders and hospital personnel.”

Salovey also said that the university will continue to provide expedited coronavirus testing for local first responders. See below for his full statement.

The announcement comes one day after Elicker sharply criticized the university during a Friday afternoon virtual press briefing.

According to Elicker and to a subsequent comment from Karen Peart, Yale’s director of media relations, the university cited dormitory rooms still filled with students’ belongings as one of the primary reasons for Yale’s turning down the city’s request to help house police officers and firefighters who do not have Covid-19 but need a place to stay because of the pandemic.

University of New Haven President Steve Kaplan agreed to make room for first responders “in the first five minutes of the conversation,” Elicker said Friday. He compared Yale’s decision to a neighbor turning down a request to shelter one’s kids “when your house is burning down” and offering instead to pay for a room at “the Econolodge across town.”

The dispute between Elicker and Yale quickly made national news in publications like Esquireand theWashington Post.

In response to Yale’s decision to make available 300 beds by the end of the week, Elicker told the Independent, “We appreciated it.”

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