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Move over, Jeff Bezos. India's richest man is now wealthier than the Amazon founder

Gautam Adani (center) attends the UP Investors Summit in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, on June 3.
Rajesh Kumar Singh
/
AP
Gautam Adani (center) attends the UP Investors Summit in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, on June 3.

Updated September 17, 2022 at 4:13 PM ET

Move over, Jeff Bezos.

India's richest man, Gautam Adani, shot past the Amazon founder this week in the rankings of the world's wealthiest people.

According to lists maintained by Forbes and Bloomberg, Adani's fortune lies somewhere between $147 billion and $152 billion, putting him at No. 2 (Bloomberg) or No. 3 (Forbes) on the lists.

Bezos currently boasts around $147 billion in total net worth, placing him third (Bloomberg) or fourth (Forbes).

A shakeup in who ranks highest among the ultrarich saw several people cycle through the second position on Friday, according to The Washington Post.

Though Adani ranks ahead of Bezos in both lists, LVMH luxury goods magnate Bernard Arnault comes up second-richest in one tally and fourth in the other.

The Times of India reported that Adani increased his wealth this year by nearly $61 billion thanks to a series of deals that have seen the industrialist's portfolio expand into cement, airports, coal and more. Adani is the first Asian to make the top three in the list of richest people.

The top spot on both lists still belongs to Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk.

In a report released earlier this year, Oxfam noted that the 10 richest men on Earth doubled their wealth during the course of the COVID-19 pandemic while the incomes of 99% of the global population suffered.

Amazon is among NPR's financial supporters.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Joe Hernandez

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