© 2024 Connecticut Public

FCC Public Inspection Files:
WEDH · WEDN · WEDW · WEDY · WNPR
WPKT · WRLI-FM · WEDW-FM · Public Files Contact
ATSC 3.0 FAQ
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

A man is charged in the 2005 theft of Judy Garland's red 'Wizard of Oz' slippers

In this April 11, 2012, file photo, Dorothy's Ruby Slippers, from the "Wizard of Oz" are on display as part of a new exhibit, "American Stories," at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington.
Jacquelyn Martin
/
AP
In this April 11, 2012, file photo, Dorothy's Ruby Slippers, from the "Wizard of Oz" are on display as part of a new exhibit, "American Stories," at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington.

A federal grand jury has indicted a Minnesota man on charges of stealing a pair of the famous ruby red slippers that Judy Garland wore in The Wizard of Oz.

Terry Martin is being charged with one count of theft of major artwork for allegedly taking the shoes, worth at least $100,000, from the Judy Garland Museum in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, according to documents with the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota.

The shoes were missing for 13 years before the FBI recovered them in 2018.

"Despite an investigation by local authorities, which included countless interviews, numerous theories, and even searches of abandoned iron ore pits, the slippers were never located and no arrests were made," the agency said at the time.

Garland wore several pairs of the slippers during production of the 1939 film. At the time of their disappearance, the shoes were one of just four pairs known to remain. They were insured for over $1 million by the shoes' owner, Michael Shaw, a collector.

The pair that were stolen are still in the custody of the FBI.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Corrected: May 19, 2023 at 12:00 AM EDT
A previous version of this story incorrectly said that the slippers are now housed at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington. In fact, they are still in the custody of the FBI.
Ayana Archie
[Copyright 2024 NPR]

Stand up for civility

This news story is funded in large part by Connecticut Public’s Members — listeners, viewers, and readers like you who value fact-based journalism and trustworthy information.

We hope their support inspires you to donate so that we can continue telling stories that inform, educate, and inspire you and your neighbors. As a community-supported public media service, Connecticut Public has relied on donor support for more than 50 years.

Your donation today will allow us to continue this work on your behalf. Give today at any amount and join the 50,000 members who are building a better—and more civil—Connecticut to live, work, and play.

Related Content